To view a video, click on either the file type or the movie image

AVI

Ventral view of multiple trout synchronously using the von Karman street; (Liao et al. 2003a, b, J. Exp. Biol. 206:1059-1073; Science 302:1566-1569).
   

Quicktime

Same trout as above adopting the von Karman gait while holding station behind a 5cm diameter cylinder (not visible in image). Reynolds number is approximately 40,000. Flow visualization as well as kinematic and electromyographic analyses indicate that trout have the ability to tune their bodies to the vortices shed behind cylinders (Liao et al. 2003a. b, J. Exp. Biol. 206:1059-1073; Science 302:1566-1569; Liao 2004, J. Exp. Biol. 207:3495-3506).
 

AVI

Ventral silhouette of a 10 cm rainbow trout swimming normally in the free stream at 4.5 body lengths per second. Flow is directed from the bottom of the image (upstream) to the top of the image (downstream); (Liao et al. 2003a, b, J. Exp. Biol. 206:1059-1073; Science 302:1566-1569).
   

AVI

Dorsal view of data shown above illustrating water flow posterior to the caudal fin of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss obtained using stereo-DPIV. W indicates lateral flow. Nauen and Lauder (2002) J. Exp. Biol. 205:3271–3279.

   

AVI

Antero-lateral view of velocity vectors showing water flow posterior to the caudal fin of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss obtained using stereo-DPIV. W indicates lateral flow. Nauen and Lauder (2002) J. Exp. Biol. 205:3271–3279.