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The following files are in either .AVI or Quicktime format. You will need an appropriate plug-in for your browser to view these files. Click on either the file type on the left or the movie image below to view.

     
AVI Ventral view of multiple trout synchronously using the von Karman street; (Liao et al. 2003a, b, J. Exp. Biol. 206:1059-1073; Science 302:1566-1569).
     
Quicktime Same trout as above adopting the von Karman gait while holding station behind a 5cm diameter cylinder (not visible in image). Reynolds number is approximately 40,000. Flow visualization as well as kinematic and electromyographic analyses indicate that trout have the ability to tune their bodies to the vortices shed behind cylinders (Liao et al. 2003a. b, J. Exp. Biol. 206:1059-1073; Science 302:1566-1569; Liao 2004, J. Exp. Biol. 207:3495-3506).
     
AVI Ventral silhouette of a 10 cm rainbow trout swimming normally in the free stream at 4.5 body lengths per second. Flow is directed from the bottom of the image (upstream) to the top of the image (downstream); (Liao et al. 2003a, b, J. Exp. Biol. 206:1059-1073; Science 302:1566-1569).
     
Quicktime

A lateral view of a juvenile plumed basilisk (Basiliscus plumifrons, approximately 20 g) running on water. A 2x2 cm grid is in the background. The ability of the lizard to run on the water decreases dramatically with an increase in size. T. Hsieh, 2003, J. Exp. Biol. 206:4363-4377 ).

Quicktime

 

Slow speed playback of the vortex wake of the bluegill pectoral fin during a turn. This wake has been generated on the opposite side as the stimulus provoking the turn and the vortex jet is oriented parallel to the body: . Drucker and Lauder (2001) J. Exp. Biol. 204: 431-432.

Quicktime

 

Vortex wake of the pectoral fin in a bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) visualized with digital particle image velocimetry in ventral view. This video shows two fin beats during steady swimming followed by a beat as the bluegill initiates a turn away from the stimulus. Drucker and Lauder (2001) J. Exp. Biol. 204: 431-432.

Quicktime

 

Slow speed playback of the vortex wake of the bluegill pectoral fin during a turn. This wake has been generated on the same side as the stimulus provoking the turn and the vortex jet is oriented perpendicular to the body. Drucker and Lauder (2001) J. Exp. Biol. 204: 431-432.

Quicktime

 

Vortex wake of the pectoral fin in a bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) visualized with digital particle image velocimetry in ventral view (see Drucker and Lauder (2001) J. Exp. Biol. 204: 431-432). This video shows two fin beats during steady swimming followed by a stronger beat as the bluegill initiates a turn toward the stimulus (to its right).

Quicktime

 

Pectoral fin locomotion in a bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) visualized from posterior and showing the fin beating through a horizontal laser light sheet. See Drucker and Lauder (1999) J. Exp. Biol. 202: 2393-2412.

Quicktime

 

Kinematics of the pectoral fin during steady horizontal locomotion by the bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum). Lateral and ventral views are simultaneous. Wilga and Lauder (2001) J. Morph. 249:195-204.

Quicktime

 

Flow over the pectoral fin during benthic station holding by the bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum). Wilga and Lauder (2001) J. Morph. 249:195-204.

Quicktime

 

Motion of the finlets during locomotion in mackerel (Scomber japonicus). See Nauen and Lauder (2000) J. Exp. Biol. 203:2247-2259.

Quicktime

 

The vortex wake of the heterocercal tail in sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). The wake is visualized using a laser light sheet and small reflective particles. Liao and Lauder (2000) J. Exp. Biol. 203:3585-3594.

Quicktime

 

Kinematics of locomotion in sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). This video was obtained synchronously with the next one to illustrate body position during steady horizontal locomotion. The tail is beating through the anterior edge of a laser light sheet. Liao and Lauder (2000) J. Exp. Biol. 203:3585-3594.

Quicktime

 

Kinematics of the caudal fin in a mackerel (Scomber japonicus). See Gibb, Dickson, and Lauder (1999) J. Exp. Biol. 202: 2433-2447.

Quicktime

 

Pectoral fin locomotion in a bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) showing simultaneous lateral and ventral views. See Gibb, Jayne, and Lauder (1994) J. Exp. Biol. 189:133-161.
Quicktime

Time sequence of vorticity and water velocity vectors resulting from use of the left pectoral fin during braking in bluegill sunfish. Data were obtained using DPIV and the bluegill was trained to feed in a location that resulted in the left pectoral fin wake intersecting the laser light sheet. The orientation of the bluegill matches the light video above. As braking occurs, a high-velocity jet of water is directed anteriorly as counterrotating centers of clockwise and counterclockwise vorticity develop (Drucker and Lauder, 2002: Integ.Comp. Biol. 42:997-1008).

 

Quicktime Light video of a bluegill sunfish using its pectoral fins to reduce forward momentum as it feeds on a small piece of worm. The pectoral fins move anterolaterally (Drucker and Lauder, 2002: Integ.Comp. Biol. 42:997-1008).

AVI

 

Dorsal view of data shown above illustrating water flow posterior to the caudal fin of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss obtained using stereo-DPIV. W indicates lateral flow. Nauen and Lauder (2002) J. Exp. Biol. 205:32713279.

AVI

 

Antero-lateral view of velocity vectors showing water flow posterior to the caudal fin of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss obtained using stereo-DPIV. W indicates lateral flow. Nauen and Lauder (2002) J. Exp. Biol. 205:32713279.